Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/7632
Title: Spatio-temporal movement of livestock in relation to decreasing pasture biomass
Contributor(s): Roberts, Jessica Jane (author); Trotter, Mark (author); Lamb, David (author); Hinch, Geoffrey (author)orcid ; Schneider, Derek (author)
Publication Date: 2010
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/7632
Abstract: The use of spatio-temporal livestock monitoring to investigate animal behaviour in relation to available biomass has the potential to improve pasture utilisation in rotational grazing systems. The aim of this study was to examine if movement metrics derived from GPS monitoring could identify variations in animal behaviour in response to decreasing pasture availability. GPS tracking collars were deployed on six cattle grazing for 46 days and data analysed to determine grazing time and spatial variation in utilisation. Unexpectedly, grazing time did not seem to be affected by decreasing pasture biomass. However, spatial utilisation of the paddock appeared to increase as biomass decreased.
Publication Type: Conference Publication
Source of Publication: Food Security from Sustainable Agriculture: Proceedings of the 15th Australian Agronomy Conference
Publisher: The Regional Institute Ltd
Place of Publication: Online
Field of Research (FOR): 070203 Animal Management
070304 Crop and Pasture Biomass and Bioproducts
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: E1 Refereed Scholarly Conference Publication
Other Links: http://www.regional.org.au/au/asa/2010/info/index.htm
http://www.regional.org.au/au/asa/2010/pastures-forage/spatial/7131_robertsjj.htm
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Appears in Collections:Conference Publication
School of Environmental and Rural Science

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