Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18474
Title: Does Size Still Matter? An Empirical Analysis of the Effectiveness of Victorian Local Authorities
Contributor(s): Drew, Joseph (author)orcid ; Dollery, Brian E (author)
Publication Date: 2016
DOI: 10.1080/03003930.2013.869497
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18474
Abstract: Efficiency approaches to the question of whether population size matters to optimal local government have proved largely inconclusive. However, recent exploratory empirical work employing an effectiveness approach - as proxied by citizen satisfaction survey data - offers a promising way forward. The present paper seeks to build upon an earlier cross-sectional analysis of Victorian local government by employing longitudinal data over a three-year period - 2008 to 2010 - for Victorian local authorities. The greater depth of data confirmed the positive associations with population density but suggests that negative linear relationships dominate over parabolic associations for population size. This result underlines the need for the collection of more local government citizen satisfaction data by Australian local government systems, given its potentially fruitful application in tackling contentious questions in contemporary local government policy debates.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Local Government Studies, 42(1), p. 15-28
Publisher: Routledge
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 0300-3930
1743-9388
Field of Research (FOR): 160509 Public Administration
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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Appears in Collections:Journal Article
UNE Business School

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