Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/12194
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dc.contributor.authorNgu, Bingen
dc.contributor.authorLow, Renaeen
dc.contributor.authorSweller, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-28T16:26:00Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.citationInstructional Science, 30(5), p. 379-402en
dc.identifier.issn1573-1952en
dc.identifier.issn0020-4277en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/12194en
dc.description.abstractIn two experiments, differential performance on chemistry problems was obtained for two training strategies: text editing and conventional problem solving. Text editing requires students to scan the text of problem statements and specify whether it provides sufficient, missing or irrelevant information for solution. It was hypothesized that text editing, which emphasizes gaining familiarity with schematic knowledge, would lead to higher achievement than conventional problem solving.Experiment one indicated that text editing was superior to conventional problem solving in learning to solve molarity and dilution problems. In particular, students who were trained in text editing skipped some intermediate steps while solving molarity problems. In contrast, using stoichiometry problems, experiment two showed that students who are trained in text editing performed worse than students given conventional problems to solve. An error analysis suggested that because of its failure to direct students' attention to the coherent problem structure in the first instance, text editing has no advantage over conventional problem solving in the domain of stoichiometry problems. It was concluded that the suitability of a text editing training strategy depends on the learning materials.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherKluwer Academic Publishersen
dc.relation.ispartofInstructional Scienceen
dc.titleText editing in chemistry instructionen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1023/a:1019833014623en
dc.subject.keywordsMathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogyen
local.contributor.firstnameBingen
local.contributor.firstnameRenaeen
local.contributor.firstnameJohnen
local.subject.for2008130208 Mathematics and Numeracy Curriculum and Pedagogyen
local.subject.seo2008930201 Pedagogyen
local.subject.seo2008930102 Learner and Learning Processesen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Educationen
local.profile.emailbngu@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryC1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordune-20130207-16156en
local.publisher.placeThe Netherlandsen
local.format.startpage379en
local.format.endpage402en
local.peerreviewedYesen
local.identifier.volume30en
local.identifier.issue5en
local.contributor.lastnameNguen
local.contributor.lastnameLowen
local.contributor.lastnameSwelleren
dc.identifier.staffune-id:bnguen
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:12400en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleText editing in chemistry instructionen
local.output.categorydescriptionC1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journalen
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 117<br />Views: 128<br />Downloads: 0en
local.search.authorNgu, Bingen
local.search.authorLow, Renaeen
local.search.authorSweller, Johnen
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Education
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