Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/19679
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dc.contributor.authorGupta, Vadakattuen
dc.contributor.authorKnox, Oliveren
dc.contributor.authorBissett, Andrewen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-07T10:08:00Z
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationThe Australian Cottongrower, 37(5), p. 46-49en
dc.identifier.issn1034-3539en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/19679en
dc.description.abstractThe role of soil biota in providing ecosystem functions for crop productivity and maintaining our soil and water resources is well recognised in the Australian cotton industry. Crop management practices such as crop rotation, tillage, crop residue retention, fertiliser and agrochemical application have been shown to influence soil biological communities with potential impact on biological functions. This is important because our soil microorganisms along with the fauna, as captured in the eukaryotic analysis, mediate carbon and nutrient cycles and play a critical role in disease suppression, degradation of agrochemicals and the maintenance of overall plant health and soil structure.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGreenmount Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofThe Australian Cottongroweren
dc.titleHow does a cotton production system change the soil biology?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.subject.keywordsEnvironmental Monitoringen
dc.subject.keywordsSoil Biologyen
dc.subject.keywordsMicrobial Ecologyen
local.contributor.firstnameVadakattuen
local.contributor.firstnameOliveren
local.contributor.firstnameAndrewen
local.subject.for2008050303 Soil Biologyen
local.subject.for2008060504 Microbial Ecologyen
local.subject.for2008050206 Environmental Monitoringen
local.subject.seo2008960904 Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Land Managementen
local.subject.seo2008960899 Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of Environments not elsewhere classifieden
local.profile.schoolSchool of Environmental and Rural Scienceen
local.profile.emailoknox@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryC3en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordune-20161021-121352en
local.publisher.placeToowoomba, Australiaen
local.identifier.runningnumberOctober - Novemberen
local.format.startpage46en
local.format.endpage49en
local.identifier.volume37en
local.identifier.issue5en
local.contributor.lastnameGuptaen
local.contributor.lastnameKnoxen
local.contributor.lastnameBissetten
dc.identifier.staffune-id:oknoxen
local.profile.orcid0000-0002-0414-5771en
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:19868en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleHow does a cotton production system change the soil biology?en
local.output.categorydescriptionC3 Non-Refereed Article in a Professional Journalen
local.relation.urlhttp://www.cottongrower.com.au/images/articles/fd63b27280a6d4d05779e0ca82732478.pdfen
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 72<br />Views: 87<br />Downloads: 0en
local.search.authorGupta, Vadakattuen
local.search.authorKnox, Oliveren
local.search.authorBissett, Andrewen
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