Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/13962
Title: Religion and BMI in Australia
Contributor(s): Kortt, Michael A (author); Dollery, Brian E (author)
Publication Date: 2014
DOI: 10.1007/s10943-012-9621-x
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/13962
Abstract: We estimated the relationship between religion and body mass index (BMI) for a general and representative sample of the Australia population. Data from the Household Income Labour Dynamics survey were analysed for 9,408 adults aged 18 and older. OLS regression analyses revealed that religious denomination was significantly related to higher BMI, after controlling for socio-demographic, health behaviours, and psychosocial variables. 'Baptist' men had, on average, a 1.3 higher BMI compared to those reporting no religious affiliation. Among women, 'Non-Christians' had, on average, a 1 unit lower BMI compared to those reporting no religious affiliation while 'Other Christian' women reported, on average, a 1 unit higher BMI. Our results also indicate that there was a negative relationship between religious importance and BMI among Australian women.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Journal of Religion and Health, 53(1), p. 217-228
Publisher: Springer New York LLC
Place of Publication: United States of America
ISSN: 0022-4197
1573-6571
Field of Research (FOR): 140208 Health Economics
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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