Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/2163
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dc.contributor.authorGoddard, Cliffen
local.source.editorEditor(s): NJ Enfielden
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-13T18:38:00Z
dc.date.issued2002en
dc.identifier.citationEthnosyntax: Explorations in Grammar and Culture, p. 52-73en
dc.identifier.isbn0199249067en
dc.identifier.isbn9780199249060en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/2163en
dc.description.abstractThe main goal of this chapter is conceptual and theoretical: to articulate and discuss the concept of ethnosyntax from the standpoint of the natural semantic metalanguage (NSM) theory of Anna Wierzbicka and colleagues (1980, 1996a; Goddard and Wierzbicka 1994, in press). I recognise two senses of the term 'ethnosyntax': a narrow sense referring to culture-related semantic content encoded in morphosyntax, and a broad sense encompassing a much wider range of phenomena in which grammar and culture may be related. The chapter begins with material which is relatively specific and concrete, and progresses in stages toward concerns which are broader and more abstract. Section 3.1 discusses ethnosyntax in the narrow sense, illustrating with a slightly reinterpreted version of some of Wierzbicka's classic work on 'fatalism' in Russian grammar. Section 3.2 discusses the relationship between ethnosyntax and ethnopragmatics, drawing on the NSM theory of cultural scripts. Section 3.3 argues for the importance of recognizing that language involves different kinds of sign-function - semantic (symbolic), iconic, indexical - and asks how we can deal with ethnosyntactic connections in the realm of iconic-indexical meaning. Section 3.4 broadens the focus further in an effort to situate ethnosyntax in a larger semiotic theory of culture, but argues that a semiotic concept of culture is not viable unless it adequately recognizes iconic and indexical, as well as semantic (symbolic), phenomena.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofEthnosyntax: Explorations in Grammar and Cultureen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesOxford linguisticsen
dc.relation.isversionof1en
dc.titleEthnosyntax, Ethnopragmatics, Sign-Functions, and Cultureen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.subject.keywordsLinguistic Structures (incl Grammar, Phonology, Lexicon, Semantics)en
local.contributor.firstnameCliffen
local.subject.for2008200408 Linguistic Structures (incl Grammar, Phonology, Lexicon, Semantics)en
local.subject.seo2008950201 Communication Across Languages and Cultureen
local.identifier.epublicationsvtls008682940en
local.profile.schoolSchool of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciencesen
local.profile.emailcgoddard@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryB1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordpes:560en
local.publisher.placeOxford, United Kingdomen
local.identifier.totalchapters12en
local.format.startpage52en
local.format.endpage73en
local.contributor.lastnameGoddarden
dc.identifier.staffune-id:cgoddarden
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:2235en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleEthnosyntax, Ethnopragmatics, Sign-Functions, and Cultureen
local.output.categorydescriptionB1 Chapter in a Scholarly Booken
local.relation.urlhttp://trove.nla.gov.au/work/32908785en
local.relation.urlhttp://www.oup.com.au/titles/academic/linguistics/9780199249060en
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 77<br />Views: 78<br />Downloads: 0en
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