Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/20955
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dc.contributor.authorEvison, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorIwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazatoen
dc.contributor.authorGuimaraes, Marco Aurelioen
dc.contributor.authorSchofield, Damianen
local.source.editorEditor(s): Stephen J Morewitz & Caroline Sturdy Collsen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-18T16:29:00Z
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationHandbook of Missing Persons, p. 427-441en
dc.identifier.isbn9783319401973en
dc.identifier.isbn9783319401997en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/20955en
dc.description.abstractThe earliest attempts to reconstitute the face from the skull so far recognised appear to arise from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) culture of circa 11,000-8000 BP (Settegast, 1990) centred on Jericho and adjacent regions of Jordan and the West Bank (Fig. 28.1). Archaeologists interpret these objects as having played a role in funerary, ancestor-worship, or similar such rites. These reconstructions were completed by modelling a facial surface in plaster. The eyes and eyelids were often replaced with cowry shells, and the skin complexion and facial features - including moustaches - were painted onto the plaster surface. The reconstructions are described as 'typized and conventional' and are not believed to represent reconstructions of ante-mortem appearance, beyond 'some features determined by the bony framework' (Strouhal, 1973, p.231). Nine millennia were to pass before the first scientific attempts to reconstruct ante-mortem appearance were to arise.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherSpringer International Publishingen
dc.relation.ispartofHandbook of Missing Personsen
dc.relation.isversionof1en
dc.titleForensic Facial Reconstruction and Its Contribution to Identification in Missing Person Casesen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-319-40199-7_28en
dc.subject.keywordsForensic Chemistryen
local.contributor.firstnameMartinen
local.contributor.firstnameEdna Sadayo Miazatoen
local.contributor.firstnameMarco Aurelioen
local.contributor.firstnameDamianen
local.subject.for2008039902 Forensic Chemistryen
local.subject.seo2008939999 Education and Training not elsewhere classifieden
local.profile.schoolSchool of Behavioural, Cognitive and Social Sciencesen
local.profile.emailmevison@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryB1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordune-20170324-141851en
local.publisher.placeCham, Switzerlanden
local.identifier.totalchapters34en
local.format.startpage427en
local.format.endpage441en
local.contributor.lastnameEvisonen
local.contributor.lastnameIwamuraen
local.contributor.lastnameGuimaraesen
local.contributor.lastnameSchofielden
dc.identifier.staffune-id:mevisonen
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:21147en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleForensic Facial Reconstruction and Its Contribution to Identification in Missing Person Casesen
local.output.categorydescriptionB1 Chapter in a Scholarly Booken
local.relation.urlhttp://trove.nla.gov.au/version/245229083en
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 10<br />Views: 10<br />Downloads: 0en
local.search.authorEvison, Martinen
local.search.authorIwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazatoen
local.search.authorGuimaraes, Marco Aurelioen
local.search.authorSchofield, Damianen
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