Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/13322
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dc.contributor.authorStuckey, Michaelen
local.source.editorEditor(s): Anthony Musson and Chantal Stebbingsen
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T15:28:00Z
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationMaking Legal History: Approaches and Methodologies, p. 215-243en
dc.identifier.isbn9781139028578en
dc.identifier.isbn9781139221221en
dc.identifier.isbn9781107014497en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/13322en
dc.description.abstractReferring to the genres of writing which make up the title of this chapter, W. K. Ferguson (in his 1948 monograph 'The Renaissance in Historical Thought') irreverently avowed "what is mirrored in the writings we have studied, though often seen darkly as in a glass", almost as though there was no (other) reality but the reflection itself. This wistful comment was, of course, an intellectual provocation. Ferguson's real point was to emphasise what he saw as a precept of history and historical writing: that the past is made up of events; events which are capable of being given meaning and construction by their observers in an active sense. His line of reasoning was that, while accepting the limitations of individual bias, and the influences of scholarly tradition, it is still incumbent upon the historian to give some meaning to recorded phenomena. Ferguson held that to interpret the past adequately, one must consciously attempt to recognise one's own perspective, and how that viewpoint relates to its intellectual heritage. With just such a frame of reference, the aim of this chapter is to explore how far the necessity for this kind of active and contemplative self-consciousness is amplified when the task at hand involves not only the interpretation of historical events but also the interpretation of a threshold for the writing of legal history itself.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofMaking Legal History: Approaches and Methodologiesen
dc.relation.isversionof1en
dc.titleAntiquarianism and legal historyen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/CBO9781139028578.014en
dc.subject.keywordsLegal Theory, Jurisprudence and Legal Interpretationen
dc.subject.keywordsBritish Historyen
local.contributor.firstnameMichaelen
local.subject.for2008180122 Legal Theory, Jurisprudence and Legal Interpretationen
local.subject.for2008210305 British Historyen
local.subject.seo2008949999 Law, Politics and Community Services not elsewhere classifieden
local.identifier.epublicationsvtls086669939en
local.profile.schoolSchool of Lawen
local.profile.emailmstuckey@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryB1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordune-20130809-144251en
local.publisher.placeCambridge, United Kingdomen
local.identifier.totalchapters17en
local.format.startpage215en
local.format.endpage243en
local.contributor.lastnameStuckeyen
dc.identifier.staffune-id:mstuckeyen
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:13534en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleAntiquarianism and legal historyen
local.output.categorydescriptionB1 Chapter in a Scholarly Booken
local.relation.urlhttp://trove.nla.gov.au/version/171847529en
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 179<br />Views: 183<br />Downloads: 0en
local.search.authorStuckey, Michaelen
Appears in Collections:Book Chapter
School of Law
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