Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/8157
Title: Whose? L2 English speakers' possessive pronoun gender errors
Contributor(s): Anton-Mendez, Ines  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2011
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1017/S1366728910000325
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/8157
Abstract: This article reports the results of an experiment on production of his/her in English as a second language (L2) by proficient native speakers of Italian, Spanish, and Dutch. In Dutch and English, 3rd person singular possessive pronouns agree in gender with their antecedents, in Italian and Spanish possessives in general agree with the noun they accompany (possessum). However, while in Italian the 3rd person singular possessives overtly agree in gender with the possessums, in Spanish they lack overt morphological gender marking. Dutch speakers were found to make very few possessive gender errors in any condition, Spanish and Italian speakers, on the other hand, behaved like Dutch speakers when the possessum was inanimate, but made more errors when it was animate (e.g., his mother). Thus, even proficient L2 speakers are susceptible to the influence of automatic processes that should apply in their first language alone. The pattern of results has implications for pronoun production and models of bilingual language production.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 14(3), p. 318-331
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Place of Publication: Cambridge, United Kindgom
ISSN: 1469-1841
1366-7289
Field of Research (FOR): 200408 Linguistic Structures (incl Grammar, Phonology, Lexicon, Semantics)
170204 Linguistic Processes (incl Speech Production and Comprehension)
200401 Applied Linguistics and Educational Linguistics
Socio-Economic Outcome Codes: 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

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