Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/8006
Title: Evaporation, Seepage and Water Quality Management in Storage Dams: A Review of Research Methods
Contributor(s): Craig, Ian (author); Aravinthan, Vasantha (author); Foley, Joe (author); Hancock, Nigel (author); Lamb, David  (author); Morrison, Pippa (author); Misra, Rabi (author); Mossad, Ruth (author); Pittaway, Pam (author); Prime, Emma (author); Rees, Steve (author); Schmidt, Erik (author); Baillie, Craig (author); Solomon, David (author); Symes, Troy (author); Turnbull, David (author); Beswick, Alan (author); Barnes, Geoff (author); Bradbury, Ronald  (author); Connell, Luke (author); Coop, Paul Andrew (author); Fellows, Christopher  (author)orcid ; Fitzmaurice, Li (author)
Publication Date: 2007
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/8006
Abstract: One of the most significant sources of water wastage in Australia is loss from small storage dams, either by seepage or evaporation. Over much of Australia, evaporative demand routinely exceeds precipitation. This paper outlines first, methodologies and measurement techniques to quantify the rate of evaporative loss from fresh water storages. These encompass high-accuracy water balance monitoring; determination of the validity of alternative estimation equations, in particular the FAO56 Penman Monteith ETo methodology; and the commencement of CFD modeling to determine a 'dam factor' in relation to practical atmospheric measurement techniques. Second, because the application of chemical monolayers is the only feasible alternative to the high cost of physically covering the storages to retard evaporation, the use of cetyl alcohol-based monolayers is reviewed, and preliminary research on their degradation by photolytic action, by wind break-up and by microbial degradation reported. Similarly, preliminary research on monolayer visualisation techniques for field application is reported; and potential enhancement of monolayers by other chemicals and attendant water quality issues are considered.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Environmental Health, 7(3), p. 84-97
Publisher: Australian Institute of Environmental Health
Place of Publication: Australia
ISSN: 1444-5212
1832-3367
Field of Research (FOR): 079901 Agricultural Hydrology (Drainage, Flooding, Irrigation, Quality, etc)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Other Links: http://journal.eh.org.au/index.php
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