Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/7915
Title: Use of feed intake as an indirect selection trait for reduction of methane emissions in grazing beef cattle
Contributor(s): Cottle, David  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2010
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/7915
Abstract: In Australia, cattle are the largest single source of greenhouse gas emissions from the agricultural sector. Genetic selection for lower emitting cattle can be attempted by direct or indirect selection. A short fed domestic index has been used to predict the genetic gain in beef cattle traits with feed intake or methane production used as selection criteria with various assumed carbon prices. Indirect selection for reduced methane emissions via feed intake was predicted to be more cost effective than direct measurement via methane emissions. It is suggested that pasture feed intake of cattle is preferable to residual feed intake, measured in a feedlot, as a selection criterion for grazing cattle. A pasture intake measurement system to assist such genetic selection is being developed.
Publication Type: Conference Publication
Conference Name: 4th International Conference on Greenhouse Gases and Animal Agriculture (GGAA), Banff, Canada, 3rd - 8th October, 2010
Conference Details: 4th International Conference on Greenhouse Gases and Animal Agriculture (GGAA), Banff, Canada, 3rd - 8th October, 2010
Source of Publication: GGAA 2010 Abstracts, p. 89-90
Publisher: GGAA 2010 website
Place of Publication: Online
Field of Research (FOR): 070203 Animal Management
HERDC Category Description: E3 Extract of Scholarly Conference Publication
Other Links: http://www.ggaa2010.org/abstracts.shtml
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Appears in Collections:Conference Publication
School of Environmental and Rural Science

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