Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/7352
Title: Television Viewing by School-Age Children: Associations with Physical Activity, Snack Food Consumption and Unhealthy Weight
Contributor(s): Brown, Judith E (author); Nicholson, Jan M (author); Broom, Dorothy H (author); Bittman, Michael (author)
Publication Date: 2011
DOI: 10.1007/s11205-010-9656-x
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/7352
Abstract: Alarm about the increasing prevalence of childhood obesity has focussed attention on individual lifestyle behaviours that may contribute to unhealthy weight. Television viewing is often a focus of the obesity debate. Not only is it sedentary, it also has the potential to influence other lifestyle behaviours either by displacing physical activities or through the consumption of high energy snack foods while watching TV. The research reported here uses data from 2,143 Australian 6-7 year children to examine the lifestyle behaviours associated with excess weight. These children spent 90 min each day watching television, 100 min each day in physical activity, and 39% consumed high levels of snack foods. Nearly one in five (18%) were overweight or obese. After adjustment for family and child characteristics, more time spent watching television was associated with more snacking and less physical activity. However, television viewing was associated with children's weight status, but snacking and physical activities were not. These findings confirm the existence from a young age, of a cluster of lifestyle behaviours that are associated with unhealthy weight status.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Social Indicators Research, 101(2), p. 221-225
Publisher: Springer Netherlands
Place of Publication: The Netherlands
ISSN: 0303-8300
1573-0921
Field of Research (FOR): 160801 Applied Sociology, Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessment
169999 Studies in Human Society not elsewhere classified
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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