Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/6453
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dc.contributor.authorSu, Xianfengen
dc.contributor.authorDuggin, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorKumar, Laliten
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-02T11:26:00Z
dc.date.created2007en
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/6453en
dc.description.abstractAustralia has abundant minerals and coal resources with mining operations being carried out across the country. Although mining disturbance is a temporary change in land use, its impact on the environment may last longer than most other disturbances. In particular, open-cut mining entirely removes the previous topsoil, plants and animals, and destroys the previous ecosystem. The deposit of waste materials such as overburden, alters the topography, causes variation in soil chemistry, and may pollute surface and ground waters. The goal of mine rehabilitation is to return the disturbed area to a stable vegetated and productive condition that is ecologically sustainable over the long term. Recovery involves vegetation colonisation that may take considerable time to demonstrate ecological sustainability, and it is difficult to judge the success of sustainable rehabilitation from short term monitoring. Prediction of vegetation colonisation patterns and rehabilitation efforts will help stakeholders to make sure that the rehabilitation practice satisfies the aims and purpose of the intended land use. Rehabilitation research has been undertaken for decades and, although some models have been developed, there is no appropriate model that can be applied to predict rehabilitation at mining sites. The aims of this study are to assess the structural and compositional changes of vegetation communities on an open-cut mining site over time; to understand the vegetation colonisation process and dynamic interactions from the individual plant level to the ecosystem level; and then to develop a simulation model to predict vegetation colonisation and subsequent long-term development during the rehabilitation process, so as to determine the potential sustainability of the developing ecosystem and to provide management advice for decision-making.en
dc.languageenen
dc.titleVegetation recovery and simulation of colonisation process of dominant species after open-cut mining at Boggabri, NSW, Australiaen
dc.typeThesis Doctoralen
dcterms.accessRightsUNE Greenen
local.contributor.firstnameXianfengen
local.contributor.firstnameJohnen
local.contributor.firstnameLaliten
dcterms.RightsStatementCopyright 2007 - Xianfeng Suen
dc.date.conferred2008en
local.thesis.degreelevelDoctoralen
local.thesis.degreenameDoctor of Philosophyen
local.contributor.grantorUniversity of New Englanden
local.profile.schoolSchool of Environmental and Rural Scienceen
local.profile.emaillkumar@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryT2en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordvtls086372343en
local.access.fulltextYesen
local.contributor.lastnameSuen
local.contributor.lastnameDugginen
local.contributor.lastnameKumaren
dc.identifier.staffune-id:lkumaren
local.profile.orcid0000-0002-9205-756Xen
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.rolesupervisoren
local.profile.rolesupervisoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:6611en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleVegetation recovery and simulation of colonisation process of dominant species after open-cut mining at Boggabri, NSW, Australiaen
local.output.categorydescriptionT2 Thesis - Doctorate by Researchen
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 63<br />Views: 61<br />Downloads: 14en
local.thesis.borndigitalnoen
local.search.authorSu, Xianfengen
local.search.supervisorDuggin, Johnen
local.search.supervisorKumar, Laliten
local.open.fileurlhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/215da3e7-3c3b-4a36-a0e8-281eb925ed9den
local.open.fileurlhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/89a2dcdf-302b-452a-89e3-6257fff6f24den
local.open.fileurlhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/bdc13eb5-318c-4d5b-84d1-298dbb23bd97en
local.open.fileurlhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/13da6d6d-af1d-41b4-a066-465de29f5ab3en
local.open.fileurlhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/5627b495-1ebf-487e-9dfa-e4ae2f8079d4en
local.open.fileurlhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/6c08473a-3a21-4ade-bb96-15654cad4fc0en
local.uneassociationYesen
local.year.conferred2008en
local.fileurl.openhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/5627b495-1ebf-487e-9dfa-e4ae2f8079d4en
local.fileurl.openhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/6c08473a-3a21-4ade-bb96-15654cad4fc0en
local.fileurl.openhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/13da6d6d-af1d-41b4-a066-465de29f5ab3en
local.fileurl.openhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/bdc13eb5-318c-4d5b-84d1-298dbb23bd97en
local.fileurl.openhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/89a2dcdf-302b-452a-89e3-6257fff6f24den
local.fileurl.openhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/215da3e7-3c3b-4a36-a0e8-281eb925ed9den
Appears in Collections:School of Environmental and Rural Science
Thesis Doctoral
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