Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/6061
Title: Effect of grain particle size and milling method on broiler performance and apparent metabolisable energy
Contributor(s): Rodgers, Nicholas  (author); Mikkelsen, Lene Lind  (author); Svihus, Birger (author); Hetland, Harald (author); Choct, Mingan  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2009
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/6061
Abstract: An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of sorghum particle size and milling type on broiler performance and feed apparent metabolisable energy (AME). Results show that AME was improved by feeding a pelleted diet containing whole sorghum, but the best performance (lowest FCR) was elicited by feeding a rolled sorghum diet at a common commercial grind size. Feed particle size may influence the rate of excretion of different fractions of the digesta and AME of a feed. AME may not be an accurate indicator of the nutritive value of grain as the same feed can have a different AME values based on physical structure.
Publication Type: Conference Publication
Conference Name: 20th Annual Australian Poultry Science Symposium, Sydney, Australia, 9th - 11th February, 2009
Conference Details: 20th Annual Australian Poultry Science Symposium, Sydney, Australia, 9th - 11th February, 2009
Source of Publication: Proceedings of the 20th Annual Australian Poultry Science Symposium: Poultry Production in a time of Global Uncertainty, p. 133-136
Publisher: Poultry Research Foundation, University of Sydney
Place of Publication: Sydney, Australia
ISSN: 1034-6260
Field of Research (FOR): 070204 Animal Nutrition
070202 Animal Growth and Development
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: E1 Refereed Scholarly Conference Publication
Other Links: http://www.vetsci.usyd.edu.au/apss/documents/APSSProceedings2009.pdf
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