Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/6039
Title: Development of a synthetic plant volatile based attractant for female noctuid moths: I. Potential sources of volatiles attractive to 'Helicoverpa armigera' (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)
Contributor(s): del Socorro, Alice (author); Gregg, Peter (author)orcid ; Alter, Daniel (author); Moore, Chris J (author)
Publication Date: 2010
DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-6055.2009.00733.x
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/6039
Abstract: This paper is the first of a series which will describe the development of a synthetic plant volatile-based attracticide for noctuid moths. It discusses potential sources of volatiles attractive to the cotton bollworm, 'Helicoverpa armigera' (Hübner), and an approach to the combination of these volatiles in synthetic blends.We screened a number of known host and non-host (for larval development) plants for attractiveness to unmated male and female moths of this species, using a two-choice olfactometer system. Out of 38 plants tested, 33 were significantly attractive to both sexes. There was a strong correlation between attractiveness of plants to males and females. The Australian natives, 'Angophora floribunda' and several 'Eucalyptus' species were the most attractive plants. These plants have not been recorded either as larval or oviposition hosts of 'Helicoverpa' spp., suggesting that attraction in the olfactometer might have been as nectar foraging rather than as oviposition sources. To identify potential compounds that might be useful in developing moth attractants, especially for females, collections of volatiles were made from plants that were attractive to moths in the olfactometer. Green leaf volatiles, floral volatiles, aromatic compounds, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes were found. We propose an approach to developing synthetic attractants, here termed 'super-blending', in which compounds from all these classes, which are in common between attractive plants, might be combined in blends which do not mimic any particular attractive plant.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Australian Journal of Entomology, 49(1), p. 10-20
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of Publication: Australia
ISSN: 1326-6756
1440-6055
Field of Research (FOR): 060201 Behavioural Ecology
070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
079902 Fertilisers and Agrochemicals (incl Application)
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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