Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/53121
Title: Co-producing a fire and seasons calendar to support renewed Indigenous cultural fire management
Contributor(s): McKemey, Michelle B  (author)orcid ; Banbai Rangers (author); Ens, Emilie J (author); Hunter, John T  (author)orcid ; Ridges, Malcolm  (author)orcid ; Costello, Oliver (author); Reid, Nick C H  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2021-11
Early Online Version: 2021-04-19
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1111/aec.13034Open Access Link
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/53121
Fields of Research (FoR) 2020: 450304 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander environmental knowledges
410205 Fire ecology
310308 Terrestrial ecology
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2020: 210402 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander connection to land and environment
180601 Assessment and management of terrestrial ecosystems
Abstract: 

Indigenous knowledge emphasises the importance of cultural connections between humans and the biophysical world. In the face of threats to the maintenance and transfer of Indigenous knowledge, novel approaches such as seasonal calendars are emerging as tools to share knowledge and guide management of natural and cultural resources. The renewal of Indigenous cultural fire management in southeast Australia provided an opportunity to explore whether the co-production of a fire and seasons calendar, using Western and Indigenous knowledges, can support cultural fire management. We present a case study of cross-cultural collaboration between scientists and the Banbai Aboriginal rangers at Wattleridge Indigenous Protected Area, New South Wales. We reviewed literature from various disciplines (archaeological, ethnohistorical, Indigenous and ecological) and undertook participatory action research and interviews to collate relevant information. This was synthesised in Winba = Fire, the Banbai Fire and Seasons Calendar, which is used by the Banbai rangers to guide cultural burning, share cross-cultural knowledge and increase awareness of Indigenous cultural fire management. The process of co-producing knowledge, revitalising culture, caring for Country, working together and supporting self-determination is relevant for many Indigenous communities around the world.

Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Austral Ecology, 46(7), p. 1011-1029
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Inc
Place of Publication: Australia
ISSN: 1442-9993
1442-9985
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Languages: E8 Baanbay
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Environmental and Rural Science
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

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