Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/3673
Title: Problem-solving training to help workers increase positive affect, job satisfaction, and life satisfaction
Contributor(s): Ayres, Jody (author); Malouff, John Michael  (author)
Publication Date: 2007
DOI: 10.1080/13594320701391804
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/3673
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of brief problemsolving training for improving adjustment in individuals who have low control over their work environment. The 118 participants were flight attendants who were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. The results indicated that when compared to the control group, those who received the problem-solving skills training reported at postintervention more problem-solving skills, more problem-solving self-efficacy, greater positive affect, higher job satisfaction, and higher life satisfaction. To assess whether improvements were due to experimenter demand, participants completed a measure of openness, which the intervention was not expected to affect. No difference in groups occurred for openness. The results provide evidence that problemsolving training can help improve adjustment in individuals working in low-control environments.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 16(3), p. 279-294
Publisher: Psychology Press
Place of Publication: London, UK
ISSN: 1359-432X
Field of Research (FOR): 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio-Economic Outcome Codes: 940599 Work and Institutional Development not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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