Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/3446
Title: United States recognition of the right to die
Contributor(s): Eburn, Michael E (author)
Publication Date: 1996
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/3446
Abstract: On 6 March 1996 the United States Court of Appeals handed down a significant decision in the matter of 'Compassion in Dying v State of Washington' (No 94-35534) (http://www.law.vill.edu/Fed-Ct/circuit/9th/opinions/9435534.htm). The case involved an application for a declaration that a Washington statute that prohibited any person assisting another to commit suicide was unconstitutional, to the extent that it applied to a physician assisting a terminally ill, mentally competent patient to commit suicide. By an eight-to-three majority, the Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit upheld the claim and struck down the legislation to the extent that it prohibited physician-assisted suicide. Although this case turned on relatively narrow grounds, in particular whether that part of the statute which prohibited a person who "aids" another to commit suicide was constitutional, the court's reasoning was much broader and will have future ramifications for the legalisation of physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Journal of Law and Medicine, v.3, p. 308-310
Publisher: Law Book Company
Place of Publication: North Ryde, Australia
ISSN: 1320-159X
Field of Research (FOR): 180199 Law not elsewhere classified
180110 Criminal Law and Procedure
HERDC Category Description: C2 Non-Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Other Links: http://www.thomsonreuters.com.au/catalogue/productdetails.asp?id=965
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