Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/32639
Title: Like Community, Like Language: Seventy-Five Years of Sindhi in Post-Partition India
Contributor(s): Iyengar, Arvind  (author)orcid ; Parchani, Sundri (author)
Publication Date: 2021
Early Online Version: 2021-11-12
Open Access: Yes
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/32639
Open Access Link: https://brill.com/view/journals/joss/1/1/article-p1_3.xml
Fields of Research (FoR) 2008: 200405 Language in Culture and Society (Sociolinguistics)
200406 Language in Time and Space (incl. Historical Linguistics, Dialectology)
200315 Indian Languages
Fields of Research (FoR) 2020: 470411 Sociolinguistics
470406 Historical, comparative and typological linguistics
470311 Indian languages
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2008: 950202 Languages and Literacy
970120 Expanding Knowledge in Language, Communication and Culture
950201 Communication Across Languages and Culture
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2020: 130202 Languages and linguistics
280116 Expanding knowledge in language, communication and culture
130201 Communication across languages and culture
Abstract: Since Partition, the Sindhi language in India has frequently been written off by scholars and laypersons alike, citing supposed linguistic corruption, ever-shrinking domains of use, and near-obsolescence in written form. However, census figures have consistently registered an increase in Sindhi speakers in India over the last seven decades. This article argues for a fresh approach to analyzing the journey of Sindhi in post-Partition India to explain this apparent discrepancy. It adopts a language-ecological perspective and evaluates salient grammatical, sociolinguistic, and script-related changes in Indian Sindhi over the last seventy-five years. The article maintains that these changes represent structurally and sociolinguistically plausible adaptations to the language’s ecosystem since Partition. It concludes that, despite a reduction in domains of use, changes in Indian Sindhi, together with an increase in speakers, testify to the language’s survival in India.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Journal of Sindhi Studies, 1(1), p. 1-32
Publisher: Brill
Place of Publication: The Netherlands
ISSN: 2667-0925
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

Files in This Item:
5 files
File Description SizeFormat 
openpublished/LikeCommunityIyengar2021JournalArticle.pdfPublished version481.9 kBAdobe PDF
Download Adobe
View/Open
Show full item record
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons