Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/30518
Title: How projected electricity price and personal values influence support for a 50% renewable energy target in Australia
Contributor(s): Phillips, Keri L  (author)orcid ; Hine, Donald W  (author)orcid ; Phillips, Wendy J  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2019-06
Early Online Version: 2019-03-09
DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2019.02.064
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/30518
Abstract: This study investigated how projected electricity prices and personal values influence public support for a 50% renewable energy target (RET) in Australia. In an online experiment, 404 participants rated their support for a 50% RET across eight projected increases in their quarterly power bills. Multi-level modelling indicated that: (1) support for the 50% RET fell as the projected price of electricity increased, (2) although participants with low self-enhancement values and high self-transcendent values were most supportive of the 50% RET, these value-based differences disappeared as projected electricity prices increased. Implications of these findings for energy policy design are discussed.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Energy Policy, v.129, p. 853-860
Publisher: Elsevier Ltd
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1873-6777
0301-4215
Field of Research (FOR): 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
170113 Social and Community Psychology
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO): 859802 Management of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation
859899 Environmentally Sustainable Energy Activities not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Psychology

Files in This Item:
1 files
File SizeFormat 
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

3
checked on May 6, 2021
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in Research UNE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.