Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/30311
Title: Post-traumatic Stress Disorder in Heart Failure Patients: A Test of the Cardiac Disease-induced PTSD Hypothesis
Contributor(s): Tully, Phillip J  (author)orcid ; Cosh, Suzanne M  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2020-01-15
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.2174/2666082215666191113121558Open Access Link
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/30311
Field of Research (FoR) 2008: 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
110201 Cardiology (incl. Cardiovascular Diseases)
Field of Research (FoR) 2020: 520302 Clinical psychology
520303 Counselling psychology
520304 Health psychology
320101 Cardiology (incl. cardiovascular diseases)
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2008: 920103 Cardiovascular System and Diseases
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2020: undefined
Abstract: Background: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is prevalent in approximately 12% of patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and such patients are at risk of further CVD morbidity and mortality. It is unknown whether CVD patients with cardiac and non-cardiac traumatic events leading to PTSD differ in medical comorbidities and psychiatric vulnerabilities. Our objective was to compare heart failure (HF) patients with cardiac and non-cardiac PTSD.
Methods: A population of HF patients from 3 hospitals underwent a two-step depression and anxiety screening process to identify potential mental health treatment needs. The post-traumatic stress disorder module of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I disorders was used to classify trauma(s) exposure, and other disorders. The patients with PTSD were sub-divided by cardiac related traumas (e.g. myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac arrest) and non-cardiac related traumas (e.g. sexual abuse, interpersonal violence).
Results: 10 patients met criteria for non-cardiac trauma and 18 patients met criteria for cardiac-induced trauma. There were no significant differences in HF aetiology or severity nor cardiac comorbidities. Time since PTSD, onset was significantly longer for those with non-cardiac PTSD. Among psychiatric comorbidities, alcohol and substance abuse disorders, as well as depression were more prevalent in patients with non-cardiac PTSD.
Conclusion: Cardiac related PTSD was associated with less alcohol and substance abuse disorders, and depression by comparison to their non-cardiac induced PTSD counterparts. Ongoing research is required to establish if cardiac-induced PTSD truly reflects a unique subtype of PTSD, and whether there are different treatment needs and therapeutic approaches for this subtype.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Current Psychiatry Research and Reviews, 15(4), p. 290-296
Publisher: Bentham Science Publishers Ltd
Place of Publication: United Arab Emirates
ISSN: 2666-0830
2666-0822
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Psychology

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