Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/30234
Title: Effects of Short-Term Human-Horse Interactions on Human Heart Rate Variability: A Multiple Single Case Study
Contributor(s): Ecker, Saan (author); Lykins, Amy  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2019
Open Access: Yes
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/30234
Open Access Link: https://docs.lib.purdue.edu/paij/vol2/iss1/2Open Access Link
Field of Research (FoR) 2008: 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Field of Research (FoR) 2020: 520304 Health psychology
520302 Clinical psychology
520303 Counselling psychology
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2008: 920401 Behaviour and Health
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2020: 200401 Behaviour and health
Abstract: Influences from human-horse interactions form the basis of the emerging field of equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP). However, the psychophysiological effects of horses on humans in the EAP context have been underinvestigated. This multiple single case design study examined the effects of short-term human-horse interactions on human heart rate variability (HRV). Nine adults with limited prior experience with horses participated in time-limited in vivo exposures to five different free-roaming horses in a yard. Results were mixed with HRV improving from a preexposure baseline in 40% and deteriorating in 23% of the 43 ten-minute horse-human interactions. In the remaining horse-human interactions, HRV was unchanged from baseline. Aggregated results showed an overall improvement in HRV across experimental phases despite considerable intrasubject and intersubject variability. These preliminary results suggest that interaction with the horses, as well as having a neutral effect, may have had either a stress-moderating effect or a stress-arousal effect on participants. This study validates findings from other studies that show a stress-moderating effect of animals in the therapeutic context and also supports findings showing human stress arousal when near horses. Findings indicate that stress arousal is an important variable that requires consideration in the EAP context. This study provides an early insight into the influences of human-horse interactions on the human autonomic nervous system, providing a foundation for further studies.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: People and Animals: The International Journal of Research and Practice, 2(1), p. 1-18
Publisher: Purdue University Press
Place of Publication: United States of America
ISSN: 2575-9078
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Psychology

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