Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/29433
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dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-16T02:41:31Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-16T02:41:31Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationQueensland Archaeological Research, v.18, p. 1-27en
dc.identifier.issn1839-339Xen
dc.identifier.issn0814-3021en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/29433-
dc.description.abstractRecent investigations into the role of shell mounds in late Holocene Aboriginal economies in northern Australia have focussed on one of the key constituents in mound sites: the intertidal bivalve, <i>Tegillarca granosa</i> (formerly <i>Anadara granosa</i>). Various researchers have suggested that shell mounds were constructed during production activities that were predominantly oriented towards exploitation of estuarine or marine ecosystems, with other resources being of secondary or supplementary importance during these times. Proponents of this model concede that it requires ongoing evaluation in relation to new quantitative data on mound composition, stratigraphy and chronology from shell mound sites across a range of different environmental contexts. At Weipa, in western Cape York Peninsula, recent research has been oriented toward collecting new data necessary for investigating the role of mound sites and the production strategies associated with their formation. In this paper, the results of excavations and analysis of a series of shell mounds at Prunung (Red Beach), to the north of Weipa, are presented. These results support the view that mound construction took place in the context of production activities strategically oriented towards intertidal flats, rather than broadly-based foraging within local site catchments, or a more generalised ‘estuarine’ orientation.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherJames Cook University, College of Arts, Society and Educationen
dc.relation.ispartofQueensland Archaeological Researchen
dc.titleLate Holocene Aboriginal shellfish production strategies in northern Australia: Insights from Prunung (Red Beach), Weipa, Cape York Peninsulaen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.25120/qar.18.2015.3498en
dcterms.accessRightsGolden
local.contributor.firstnameMichaelen
local.subject.for2008210101 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Archaeologyen
local.subject.for2008210102 Archaeological Scienceen
local.subject.seo2008950503 Understanding Australia's Pasten
local.profile.schoolSchool of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciencesen
local.profile.emailmmorri62@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryC1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.publisher.placeAustraliaen
local.format.startpage1en
local.format.endpage27en
local.identifier.scopusid85028547755en
local.peerreviewedYesen
local.identifier.volume18en
local.title.subtitleInsights from Prunung (Red Beach), Weipa, Cape York Peninsulaen
local.access.fulltextYesen
local.contributor.lastnameMorrisonen
dc.identifier.staffune-id:mmorri62en
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:1959.11/29433en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleLate Holocene Aboriginal shellfish production strategies in northern Australiaen
local.output.categorydescriptionC1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journalen
local.search.authorMorrison, Michaelen
local.uneassociationNoen
local.atsiresearchYesen
dc.subject.austlangY24 Thaynakwithen
local.sensitive.culturalNoen
local.year.published2015en
local.fileurl.closedpublishedhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/c3e34970-6080-47e1-93ae-85b11bd717e7en
local.subject.for2020450101 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander archaeologyen
local.subject.for2020450102 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artefactsen
local.subject.for2020430101 Archaeological scienceen
local.subject.seo2020130703 Understanding Australia’s pasten
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School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences
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