Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/29230
Title: Integration of energy and protein transactions in the body to build new tools for predicting performance and body composition of ruminants
Contributor(s): Oddy, V H  (author)orcid ; Dougherty, H C  (author)orcid ; Oltjen, J W (author)
Publication Date: 2019
Early Online Version: 2019-09-16
DOI: 10.1071/AN19229
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/29230
Abstract: Increased market pressure to improve meat yield and quality require improved methods of predicting body composition in growing animals. Current systems of animal nutrition based on nutrient supply and animal characteristics predict animal growth from nutrient inputs, but, as of yet, do not accurately predict body composition. The present paper explores the evidence and data required to support an existing model of the effects of energy intake on visceral and muscle protein mass and energy expenditure to predict heat production, growth and body composition of sheep. While parameters of the model related to energetic costs of protein in muscle and viscera can be supported by independent studies, parameters associated with energetic costs of protein gain, particularly in viscera, are harder to reconcile with independent measurements. The range of available data on systematic changes in visceral organ mass over time in response to feed intake is limited, which may constrain generalisation of the parameters of the model with regard to the wide range of production situations faced by the sheep and cattle industries. However, sufficient data exist in the literature to test, and if required, revise the current framework.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Animal Production Science, 59(11), p. 1970-1979
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Place of Publication: Australia
ISSN: 1836-5787
1836-0939
Field of Research (FOR): 070204 Animal Nutrition
070202 Animal Growth and Development
070103 Agricultural Production Systems Simulation
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO): 839899 Environmentally Sustainable Animal Production not elsewhere classified
830301 Beef Cattle
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Environmental and Rural Science

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