Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/27219
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dc.contributor.authorAliloo, Hen
dc.contributor.authorPryce, J Een
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez-Recio, Oen
dc.contributor.authorCocks, B Gen
dc.contributor.authorGoddard, M Een
dc.contributor.authorHayes, B Jen
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-20T03:31:03Z-
dc.date.available2019-06-20T03:31:03Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Dairy Science, 100(2), p. 1203-1222en
dc.identifier.issn0022-0302en
dc.identifier.issn1525-3198en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/27219-
dc.description.abstractWe compared the outcome of mating programs based on different evaluation models that included nonadditive genetic effects (dominance and heterozygosity) in addition to additive effects. The additive and dominance marker effects and the values of regression on average heterozygosity were estimated using 632,003 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 7,902 and 7,510 Holstein cows with calving interval and production (milk, fat, and protein yields) records, respectively. Expected progeny values were computed based on the estimated genetic effects and genotype probabilities of hypothetical progeny from matings between the available genotyped cows and the top 50 young genomic bulls. An index combining the traits based on their economic values was developed and used to evaluate the performance of different mating scenarios in terms of dollar profit. We observed that mating programs with nonadditive genetic effects performed better than a model with only additive effects. Mating programs with dominance and heterozygosity effects increased milk, fat, and protein yields by up to 38, 1.57, and 1.21 kg, respectively. The inclusion of dominance and heterozygosity effects decreased calving interval by up to 0.70 d compared with random mating. The average reduction in progeny inbreeding by the inclusion of nonadditive genetic effects in matings compared with random mating was between 0.25 to 1.57 and 0.64 to 1.57 percentage points for calving interval and production traits, respectively. The reduction in inbreeding was accompanied by an average of A$8.42 (Australian dollars) more profit per mating for a model with additive, dominance, and heterozygosity effects compared with random mating. Mate allocations that benefit from nonadditive genetic effects can improve progeny performance only in the generation where it is being implemented, and the gain from specific combining abilities cannot be accumulated over generations. Continuous updating of genomic predictions and mate allocation programs are required to benefit from nonadditive genetic effects in the long term.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherElsevier Incen
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Dairy Scienceen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.titleIncluding nonadditive genetic effects in mating programs to maximize dairy farm profitabilityen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.3168/jds.2016-11261en
dc.identifier.pmid27939540en
dcterms.accessRightsGolden
local.contributor.firstnameHen
local.contributor.firstnameJ Een
local.contributor.firstnameOen
local.contributor.firstnameB Gen
local.contributor.firstnameM Een
local.contributor.firstnameB Jen
local.subject.for2008070201 Animal Breedingen
local.subject.for2008060412 Quantitative Genetics (incl. Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)en
local.subject.for2008060408 Genomicsen
local.subject.seo2008839999 Animal Production and Animal Primary Products not elsewhere classifieden
local.profile.schoolSchool of Environmental and Rural Scienceen
local.profile.emailhaliloo@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryC1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.publisher.placeUnited States of Americaen
local.format.startpage1203en
local.format.endpage1222en
local.peerreviewedYesen
local.identifier.volume100en
local.identifier.issue2en
local.access.fulltextYesen
local.contributor.lastnameAlilooen
local.contributor.lastnamePryceen
local.contributor.lastnameGonzalez-Recioen
local.contributor.lastnameCocksen
local.contributor.lastnameGoddarden
local.contributor.lastnameHayesen
dc.identifier.staffune-id:halilooen
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:1959.11/27219en
local.date.onlineversion2016-12-09-
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleIncluding nonadditive genetic effects in mating programs to maximize dairy farm profitabilityen
local.relation.fundingsourcenoteDairy Futures Cooperative Research Centreen
local.output.categorydescriptionC1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journalen
local.search.authorAliloo, Hen
local.search.authorPryce, J Een
local.search.authorGonzalez-Recio, Oen
local.search.authorCocks, B Gen
local.search.authorGoddard, M Een
local.search.authorHayes, B Jen
local.uneassociationUnknownen
local.year.available2016en
local.year.published2017en
local.fileurl.closedpublishedhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/a9791c1c-9bca-4c41-9f7e-6610063a07ceen
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Environmental and Rural Science
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