Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/26689
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dc.contributor.authorSharpley, Christopher Fen
dc.contributor.authorChristie, David R Hen
dc.contributor.authorBitsika, Vickien
dc.contributor.authorAgnew, Linda Len
dc.contributor.authorAndronicos, Nicholas Men
dc.contributor.authorMcMillan, Mary Een
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-10T06:27:19Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-10T06:27:19Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 27(3), p. 1072-1074en
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en
dc.identifier.issn1099-1611en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/26689-
dc.description.abstractThe link between chronic stress and depression has been established for some time.<sup>1</sup> Major physical illness represents such a chronic stressor, and people who suffer from such illnesses have been shown to be at an increased risk of developing depression.<sup>2</sup> Perhaps, one of the most feared of all illnesses is cancer.<sup>3</sup> Among Australian men, the most common form of cancer is prostate cancer (PCa).<sup>4</sup> Meta-analytic data indicate that PCa patients suffer depression at a prevalence of 18.44% following treatment,<sup>5</sup> several times higher than the 3% to 4% prevalence in men of similar ages from the general population.<sup>6</sup> Depression in PCa patients adds to their overall disease burden and may also impede their recovery from PCa.<sup>7</sup> Although most of the endpoints that have been measured in studies of depression in these men have been associated with medical and surgical costs, plus mortality,<sup>7</sup> the links with the wider biological consequences of this elevated depression are also of value when formulating a comprehensive model of PCa depression.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltden
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen
dc.titleAssociations between reduced telomere length, depressed mood, anhedonia, and irritability in prostate cancer patients: Further evidence for the presence of "male depression"?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.4547en
dc.identifier.pmid28857340en
local.contributor.firstnameChristopher Fen
local.contributor.firstnameDavid R Hen
local.contributor.firstnameVickien
local.contributor.firstnameLinda Len
local.contributor.firstnameNicholas Men
local.contributor.firstnameMary Een
local.subject.for2008110999 Neurosciences not elsewhere classifieden
local.subject.for2008111203 Cancer Geneticsen
local.subject.seo2008970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciencesen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Science and Technologyen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Science and Technologyen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Science and Technologyen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Science and Technologyen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Science and Technologyen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Science and Technologyen
local.profile.emailcsharpl3@une.edu.auen
local.profile.emaildchrist2@une.edu.auen
local.profile.emailvbitsik2@une.edu.auen
local.profile.emaillagnew2@une.edu.auen
local.profile.emailnandroni@une.edu.auen
local.profile.emailmrookle2@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryC1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen
local.format.startpage1072en
local.format.endpage1074en
local.peerreviewedYesen
local.identifier.volume27en
local.identifier.issue3en
local.title.subtitleFurther evidence for the presence of "male depression"?en
local.contributor.lastnameSharpleyen
local.contributor.lastnameChristieen
local.contributor.lastnameBitsikaen
local.contributor.lastnameAgnewen
local.contributor.lastnameAndronicosen
local.contributor.lastnameMcMillanen
dc.identifier.staffune-id:csharpl3en
dc.identifier.staffune-id:dchrist2en
dc.identifier.staffune-id:vbitsik2en
dc.identifier.staffune-id:lagnew2en
dc.identifier.staffune-id:nandronien
dc.identifier.staffune-id:mrookle2en
local.profile.orcid0000-0001-7922-4848en
local.profile.orcid0000-0002-2803-0995en
local.profile.orcid0000-0001-5881-2296en
local.profile.orcid0000-0002-2336-3985en
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:1959.11/26689en
local.date.onlineversion2017-08-30-
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleAssociations between reduced telomere length, depressed mood, anhedonia, and irritability in prostate cancer patientsen
local.output.categorydescriptionC1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journalen
local.search.authorSharpley, Christopher Fen
local.search.authorChristie, David R Hen
local.search.authorBitsika, Vickien
local.search.authorAgnew, Linda Len
local.search.authorAndronicos, Nicholas Men
local.search.authorMcMillan, Mary Een
local.uneassociationUnknownen
local.year.available2017en
local.year.published2018en
local.fileurl.closedpublishedhttps://rune.une.edu.au/web/retrieve/3f28e984-097a-4657-8223-52973d57fcf9en
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Science and Technology
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