Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/2417
Title: Altering broiler gut development, morphology, microbiology and function by manipulating feed grain type, particle size and milling method affects life-long performance
Contributor(s): Rodgers, Nicholas  (author); Iji, Paul  (supervisor); Choct, Mingan  (supervisor); Mikkelsen, Lene Lind (supervisor); Kocher, Andreas (supervisor)
Conferred Date: 2009
Copyright Date: 2008
Open Access: Yes
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/2417
Abstract: The modern broiler chicken increases its bodyweight by 5000% in the first six weeks of life. Even so, the genetic potential of the bird is ever increasing. The intensive nature of the modern broiler meat production system also potentially increases risk of transmissible diseases. Thus, the stresses on the bird's physiological systems; skeletal/muscular, digestive, immune and cardiovascular, are also increasing. Augmentation of suitable husbandry practices with appropriate nutrition will allow improved broiler production and health, by helping the birds’ physiological systems serve their respective intended purposes. That is, nutritionists need to present a feed to the broiler that more accurately meets its needs, not only on a nutritional level, but also on a physiological level, such that the bird is more able to effectively digest and absorb the feed due to improved physiological responses to the feed itself. The nutritionist can only do so much when it comes to feeding for profit. Aside from the nutritional needs of the bird, economic constraint is the largest factor that must be considered when formulating a broiler diet. It is therefore important that feed production costs are reduced, and at the other end, feed efficiency is improved, essentially enabling a more profitable product per unit cost of feed.
Publication Type: Thesis Doctoral
Field of Research Codes: 070204 Animal Nutrition
070202 Animal Growth and Development
060603 Animal Physiology - Systems
Rights Statement: Copyright 2008 - Nicholas James Rodgers
HERDC Category Description: T2 Thesis - Doctorate by Research
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Appears in Collections:School of Environmental and Rural Science
Thesis Doctoral

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