Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/23051
Title: Behavioural consistency and group conformity in humbug damselfish
Contributor(s): Burns, Alicia L J (author); Schaerf, Timothy (author)orcid ; Ward, Ashley J W (author)
Publication Date: 2017
DOI: 10.1163/1568539x-00003470
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/23051
Abstract: Humbug damselfish, Dascyllus aruanus, are a common coral reef fish that form stable social groups with size-based social hierarchies. Here we caught whole wild groups of damselfish and tested whether social groups tended to be comprised of animals that are more similar to one another in terms of their behavioural type, than expected by chance. First we found that individuals were repeatable in their level of activity and exploration, and that this was independent of both absolute size and within-group dominance rank, indicating that animals were behaviourally consistent. Secondly, despite the fact that individuals were tested independently, the behaviour of members of the same groups was significantly more similar than expected under a null model, suggesting that individual behaviour develops and is shaped by conformity to the behaviour of other group members. This is one of the first studies to demonstrate this group-level behavioural conformity in wild-caught groups.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Behaviour, 154(13-15), p. 1343-1359
Publisher: Brill
Place of Publication: The Netherlands
ISSN: 0005-7959
Field of Research (FOR): 010202 Biological Mathematics
060201 Behavioural Ecology
060801 Animal Behaviour
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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