Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/22985
Title: Does psychological resilience buffer against the link between the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and depression following stress?
Contributor(s): Sharpley, Christopher  (author)orcid ; Christie, David  (author); Bitsika, Vicki  (author)orcid ; Agnew, Linda  (author)orcid ; Andronicos, Nicholas  (author)orcid ; McMillan, Mary  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2017
DOI: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2017.07.029
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/22985
Abstract: The comparative strength of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism as a 'predictor' of depression after major stress, versus the 'protective' effect of psychological resilience (PR) against depression after major stress, was tested in a homogeneous sample of older men who had all received a diagnosis and treatment for prostate cancer. Results supported the association between PR and lower depression after stress, but did not support the association between the 5-HTTLPR and elevated depression after stress. Examination of PR at scale, factor, and item level identified the specific PR-related behaviour that was the most powerful predictor of low depression. These data suggest that the carriage of the short form of the 5-HTTLPR may negate the protective effect of PR against depression in these men, or that PR may nullify the depression vulnerability of this form of the 5-HTTLPR. These findings may explain some of the 'null' findings regarding the link between the 5-HTTLPR and depression in the wider literature by arguing for an interaction between these two factors in the association between major stress and depression.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Physiology & Behavior, v.180, p. 53-59
Publisher: Elsevier Inc
Place of Publication: United States of America
ISSN: 1873-507X
0031-9384
Fields of Research (FoR) 2008: 110903 Central Nervous System
Fields of Research (FoR) 2020: 320903 Central nervous system
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2008: 920111 Nervous System and Disorders
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2020: 200409 Mental health
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Science and Technology

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