Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/22386
Title: Multiple-trait QTL mapping and genomic prediction for wool traits in sheep
Contributor(s): Bolormaa, Sunduimijid (author); Swan, Andrew (author); Brown, Daniel (author); Hatcher, Sue (author); Moghaddar, Nasir (author); Van Der Werf, Julius H (author)orcid ; Goddard, Michael E (author); Daetwyler, Hans D (author)
Publication Date: 2017
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1186/s12711-017-0337-y
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/22386
Open Access Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12711-017-0337-y
Abstract: The application of genomic selection to sheep breeding could lead to substantial increases in profitability of wool production due to the availability of accurate breeding values from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Several key traits determine the value of wool and influence a sheep's susceptibility to fleece rot and fly strike. Our aim was to predict genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) and to compare three methods of combining information across traits to map polymorphisms that affect these traits.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Genetics Selection Evolution, v.49, p. 1-22
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1297-9686
0999-193X
Field of Research (FOR): 070201 Animal Breeding
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Other Links: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
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Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Environmental and Rural Science

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