Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/22038
Title: Is daily replication necessary when sampling cortisol concentrations in association studies of children with autism spectrum disorder? A systematic review and discussion paper
Contributor(s): Sharpley, Christopher  (author)orcid ; Bitsika, Vicki  (author)orcid ; Agnew, Linda  (author)orcid ; Andronicos, Nicholas  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2017
DOI: 10.1515/revneuro-2016-0037
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/22038
Abstract: Salivary cortisol may be used as a biomarker of stress and anxiety in children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Some suggestions have been made that the measurement of cortisol needs to be undertaken by repeated days' observations to ensure reliability of the data obtained. These requirements are discussed in regard to 14 studies of the test-retest agreement and stability in cortisol data across repeated daily measurements. Results of those studies almost universally fail to support the argument for repeated daily measurements of cortisol. Implications for the research protocols of studies using cortisol as an index of stress in children with ASD are discussed.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Reviews in the Neurosciences, 28(1), p. 103-111
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH
Place of Publication: Germany
ISSN: 2191-0200
0334-1763
Fields of Research (FoR) 2008: 110903 Central Nervous System
Fields of Research (FoR) 2020: 320903 Central nervous system
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2008: 920111 Nervous System and Disorders
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2020: 200409 Mental health
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Science and Technology

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