Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/21790
Title: Surviving workplace adversity: a qualitative study of nurses and midwives and their strategies to increase personal resilience
Contributor(s): McDonald, Glenda (author); Jackson, Debra (author); Vickers, Margaret H (author); Wilkes, Lesley (author)
Publication Date: 2015
DOI: 10.1111/jonm.12293
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/21790
Abstract: Aim To explore the experiences of Australian nurses and midwives who perceived themselves as resilient. The focus of this paper is to report the strategies used by a group of nurses and midwives to develop and maintain their resilience, despite encountering serious workplace adversity. Background Despite the potentially adverse effects of nursing work, many nurses and midwives thrive through exercising self-efficacy and coping skills. The relationship between thriving and resilience is clear, as resilience refers to the ability to cope well with adversity and change. Methods The participants were part of an instrumental, collective case study investigation of personal resilience amongst nurses and midwives. Prior to an innovative, work-based intervention including workshops and mentoring, participants were interviewed to collect baseline perceptions and experiences of personal resilience and workplace adversity. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically. Results Participants attributed their ability to thrive in the workplace to three major influences: support networks, personal characteristics and ability to organise work for personal resilience. Conclusions Participant insights contributed to a deeper understanding of personal resilience and highlight future initiatives to enhance the ability of nurses and midwives to thrive within health organisations and systems. Implications for nursing management It is vital that resilience-enhancing initiatives, such as peer mentoring and tailored work options to increase autonomy, are implemented at earlier career phases.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Journal of Nursing Management, 24(1), p. 123-131
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1365-2834
0966-0429
Field of Research (FOR): 111006 Midwifery
111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Statistics to Oct 2018: Visitors: 14
Views: 95
Downloads: 0
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Health

Files in This Item:
2 files
File Description SizeFormat 
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

13
checked on Nov 30, 2018

Page view(s)

78
checked on Apr 17, 2019
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

 

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

 

Items in Research UNE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.