Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/21014
Title: Can community-based governance strengthen citizenship in support of climate change adaptation? Testing insights from Self-Determination Theory
Contributor(s): Marshall, Graham R (author); Hine, Don W (author); East, Miriam (author)
Publication Date: 2017
DOI: 10.1016/j.envsci.2017.02.010
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/21014
Abstract: Motivation plays a powerful role in guiding human decision-making and behaviour, including adaptation to climate change. This study aimed to determine whether community-based governance would increase behavioural support, in the form of donation behaviour, for a climate change adaptation trust fund. A sample of 548 Australians was randomly assigned to view one of two governance scenarios: (1) a community-based scenario in which community members were afforded a high level of autonomy in designing and allocating funding within a trust fund to help their community adapt to climate change, or (2) a government-centred scenario in which decision making regarding the trust fund remained with government officials. Path analysis revealed that the community-based scenario produced significantly higher levels of perceived autonomy support within the study's participants. High levels of perceived autonomy support predicted higher levels of autonomous motivation (indicating stronger citizenship) and lower levels of amotivation, a motivational pattern, which, in turn, predicted greater willingness to donate to the climate change adaptation trust. Results are interpreted in terms of Self-Determination Theory and Motivational Crowding Theory.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Environmental Science & Policy, v.72, p. 1-9
Publisher: Elsevier Inc
Place of Publication: United States of America
ISSN: 1462-9011
1873-6416
Field of Research (FOR): 140205 Environment and Resource Economics
170113 Social and Community Psychology
050205 Environmental Management
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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