Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/20948
Title: Supporting children's well-being: Outcomes of a rural child-focused education program for separating or divorced parents
Contributor(s): Dunstan, Debra (author)orcid ; Talbot, Catherine J (author); del Pozo de Bolger, Andrea (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2017
DOI: 10.1111/ajr.12250
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/20948
Abstract: This study examined the effectiveness of the educational components of a child-focused Post Separation Cooperative Parenting (PSCP) program aimed at lowering inter-parental acrimony, improving parent-child relationships and supporting adaptive outcomes for an identified child. Inter-parental acrimony is common among adults whose relationship has broken down1 and can have a detrimental effect on their child's adjustment, both currently and into the future. Impacts include poor academic achievement, behavioural and emotional disorders and antisocial and criminal conduct. The parent-child relationship might also suffer. These implications, and the high rate of separation and divorce in Australia, has led the Australian Government to fund not-for-profit organisations to offer counselling, parental dispute education and mediation services to affected families. These PSCP programs help parents learn how conflict affects children, and how to focus on the needs and well-being of the child. This study evaluated an innovative education and skills training program developed by Centacare New England North West Family Relationship Centre and delivered to parents in rural New South Wales as part of a PSCP program.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Australian Journal of Rural Health, 25(2), p. 132-133
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of Publication: Australia
ISSN: 1038-5282
Field of Research (FOR): 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Statistics to Oct 2018: Visitors: 20
Views: 30
Downloads: 0
Appears in Collections:Journal Article

Files in This Item:
2 files
File Description SizeFormat 
Show full item record

Page view(s)

140
checked on Feb 6, 2019
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

 

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

 

Items in Research UNE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.