Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/20238
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dc.contributor.authorIedema, Ricken
dc.contributor.authorBower, Kateen
dc.contributor.authorPiper, Donellaen
local.source.editorEditor(s): Rick Iedema, Donella Piper, Marie Manidisen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-22T19:07:00Z
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationCommunicating Quality and Safety in Health Care, p. 302-315en
dc.identifier.isbn9781107699328en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/20238en
dc.description.abstractAnalyses of medical records, incident reports, observations and interviews have revealed that care may at times go wrong. The frequency of such failures and errors is difficult to establish, mainly due to a lack of reliability of relevant documentation. Errors and failures are not always reported and are not always immediately evident Reported incident rates have varied between 6% and 16% (Wilson et al., 1995), with some commentators putting incident rates as high as 25-30% (Classen et al., 2011). A small proportion of these incidents involve death and permanent disability (Vincent et al., 2008). When a patient experiences harm as a result of an incident, it is now mandatory in most Australian health services that they are told what went wrong and why, a practice referred to as incident disclosure or 'open disclosure'. The policy that mandates incident disclosure is the 'Australian Open Disclosure Framework' (Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, 2013).en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.ispartofCommunicating Quality and Safety in Health Careen
dc.relation.isversionof1en
dc.titleCommunicating bad news: when care goes wrongen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.subject.keywordsHealth Care Administrationen
dc.subject.keywordsOrganisational, Interpersonal and Intercultural Communicationen
local.contributor.firstnameRicken
local.contributor.firstnameKateen
local.contributor.firstnameDonellaen
local.subject.for2008200105 Organisational, Interpersonal and Intercultural Communicationen
local.subject.for2008111709 Health Care Administrationen
local.subject.seo2008920299 Health and Support Services not elsewhere classifieden
local.profile.schoolUNE Business Schoolen
local.profile.emaildpiper@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryB1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordune-20170223-155951en
local.publisher.placeMelbourne, Australiaen
local.identifier.totalchapters23en
local.format.startpage302en
local.format.endpage315en
local.title.subtitlewhen care goes wrongen
local.contributor.lastnameIedemaen
local.contributor.lastnameBoweren
local.contributor.lastnamePiperen
dc.identifier.staffune-id:dpiperen
local.profile.orcid0000-0002-5802-6380en
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:20436en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleCommunicating bad newsen
local.output.categorydescriptionB1 Chapter in a Scholarly Booken
local.relation.urlhttp://trove.nla.gov.au/version/215539310en
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 35<br />Views: 35<br />Downloads: 0en
local.search.authorIedema, Ricken
local.search.authorBower, Kateen
local.search.authorPiper, Donellaen
Appears in Collections:Book Chapter
UNE Business School
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