Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/19932
Title: An internet survey of emotional health, treatment seeking and barriers to accessing mental health treatment among Chinese-speaking international students in Australia
Contributor(s): Lu, Sharon Huixian (author); Dear, Blake Farran (author); Johnston, Luke (author); Wootton, Bethany (author); Titov, Nickolai (author)
Publication Date: 2014
Publisher: Routledge
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
DOI: 10.1080/09515070.2013.824408
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/19932
ISSN: 0951-5070
1469-3674
Source of Publication: Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 27(1), p. 96-108
Abstract: The present internet survey examined the demographic characteristics of Chinese-speaking international students in Australia, psychological distress levels as measured by the Kessler-10 (K-10) Item scale, help-seeking history and preferences, as well as treatment barriers. Of the 144 respondents, 54% reported high psychological distress (mean K-10 score = 23.96; SD = 9.03). However, only 9% of those who were highly distressed reported they had sought mental health services in the past year. While the majority preferred help from informal social networks, they tended to favour mental health services over traditional culture-specific forms of help. Common barriers to accessing mental health services reported by respondents with high psychological distress included costs or transportation concerns, limited knowledge of available services, time constraints, the perception that symptoms were not severe enough to warrant treatment, language difficulties and lack of knowledge of symptoms of psychological distress. Although the majority preferred face-to-face treatments over internet treatments, a considerable percentage of respondents were willing to try either treatment modality. Chinese-speaking international students are a high risk group for developing psychological distress, yet they tend to underuse mental health services. Education about the effectiveness of face-to-face and online treatments may increase treatment seeking by this population.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Fields of Research (FOR): 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio-economic Objective (SEO): 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Peer Reviewed: Yes
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