Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18882
Title: Augmented reality, virtual reality and gaming: an integral part of nursing
Contributor(s): Ferguson, Caleb (author); Davidson, Patricia M (author); Scott, Peter J (author); Jackson, Debra (author); Hickman, Louise D (author)
Publication Date: 2015
DOI: 10.1080/10376178.2015.1130360
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18882
Abstract: A powerful quote by Michael J. Fox beautifully illustrates that 'we should teach the way people learn'. Academics and nurses have to adapt their teaching approaches to accommodate the learner, as people learn in many different ways. Augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR) and gaming provide an immersive learner experience, more than ever before new ways of learning are needed and this applies to academics, students, nurses and patients. These technologies can be utilised in many settings to assist in health behaviour change interventions, optimise care, and improve health outcomes of individuals across all care settings. Drawing on the ubiquitous influence of technology that is cost-effective, and the pervasive nature of smart phone technology to enhance how we learn and how we can access education is essential for keeping up with the latest research and practice issues. When used appropriately these technologies provide tools for nurse educationalists to enhance teaching and learning in all on-campus, off-campus and clinical settings. The current ranges of technologies literally transform any context or situation into a learning opportunity. These technologies can mean that expert help is at hand for nurses in the clinical environment, and that information and learning support can be accessed as needed. Academics with responsibility for curriculum renewal should integrate AR and VR as contemporary teaching and learning strategies for students. Further, health facilities should ensure the upskilling of their existing nursing workforce to best apply AR and VR technologies across all types of care settings.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Contemporary Nurse, 51(1), p. 1-4
Publisher: Routledge
Place of Publication: Melbourne, Australia
ISSN: 1839-3535
1037-6178
Field of Research (FOR): 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C4 Letter of Note
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Appears in Collections:Journal Article

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