Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18774
Title: A cluster randomized-controlled trial of a community mobilization intervention to change gender norms and reduce HIV risk in rural South Africa: study design and intervention
Contributor(s): Pettifor, Audrey (author); Lippman, Sheri A (author); Daniel, Tamu (author); Gomez-Olive, F Xavier (author); Kahn, Kathleen (author); MacPhail, Catherine  (author)orcid ; Selin, Amanda M (author); Peacock, Dean (author); Gottert, Ann (author); Maman, Suzanne (author); Rebombo, Dumisani (author); Suchindran, Chirayath M (author); Twine, Rhian (author); Lancaster, Kathryn (author)
Publication Date: 2015
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1186/s12889-015-2048-zOpen Access Link
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18774
Abstract: Background: Community mobilization (CM) interventions show promise in changing gender norms and preventing HIV, but few have been based on a defined mobilization model or rigorously evaluated. The purpose of this paper is to describe the intervention design and implementation and present baseline findings of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) of a two-year, theory-based CM intervention that aimed to change gender norms and reduce HIV risk in rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa. Methods: Community Mobilizers and volunteer Community Action Teams (CATs) implemented two-day workshops, a range of outreach activities, and leadership engagement meetings. All activities were mapped onto six theorized mobilization domains. The intervention is being evaluated by a randomized design in 22 communities (11 receive intervention). Cross-sectional, population-based surveys were conducted with approximately 1,200 adults ages 18-35 years at baseline and endline about two years later. Conclusions: This is among the first community RCTs to evaluate a gender transformative intervention to change norms and HIV risk using a theory-based, defined mobilization model, which should increase the potential for impact on desired outcomes and be useful for future scale-up if proven effective. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02129530
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: BMC Public Health, v.15, p. 1-7
Publisher: BioMed Central Ltd
Place of Publication: London, United Kingdom
ISSN: 1471-2458
Field of Research (FOR): 111706 Epidemiology
160805 Social Change
111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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