Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18758
Title: If you knew the end of a story would you still want to hear it? Using research poems to listen to Aboriginal stories
Contributor(s): Saunders, Vicki (author); Usher, Kim  (author); Tsey, Komla (author); Bainbridge, Roxanne (author)
Publication Date: 2016
DOI: 10.1080/08893675.2016.1133082
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18758
Abstract: This paper presents a poem created whilst conducting an inquiry into one of the endings of stories told of, and by, people living with mental illness: this story ending is grouped by a word (and social movement) widely known as Recovery in mental health care. Recovery, however, is not a word commonly used in the places where this Inquiry occurred. Nor is it a category of story ending often told about Australian Aboriginal people living with a diagnosis of chronic mental illness. This inquiry was, and is, thus focussed on how the current endings of stories that surround Australian Aboriginal peoples in mental health care are being/ were told and "heard". This paper is an attempt to use poetry as a therapeutic and storytelling strategy to highlight the difference between hearing and listening, and how that difference relates to the word Recovery as a paradigm shift and story of social change.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Journal of Poetry Therapy, 29(1), p. 1-13
Publisher: Routledge
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1567-2344
0889-3675
Field of Research (FOR): 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO): 920399 Indigenous Health not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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