Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18719
Title: The effect of weight controllability beliefs on prejudice and self-efficacy
Contributor(s): Thorsteinsson, Einar B (author)orcid ; Loi, Natasha (author)orcid ; Breadsell, Dana (author)
Publication Date: 2016
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.7717/peerj.1764
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18719
Open Access Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.1764
Abstract: An experiment was conducted to test for the presence of prejudice towards obesity and whether weight controllability beliefs information reduces this prejudice and impacts on a person's own healthy eating self-efficacy. The experiment randomly allocated 346 participants (49 males) into one of three conditions: controllable contributors toward obesity condition (e.g., information about personal control about diet and exercise); uncontrollable contributors toward obesity condition (e.g., information about genes, factors in society); and a control condition with no information given. Prejudice was present in 81% of the sample. High prejudice was predicted by low self-efficacy for exercise and weight. Weight controllability beliefs information had no significant effect on prejudice levels or exercise or healthy eating self-efficacy levels. Future research directions are discussed.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: PeerJ, v.4, p. 1-14
Publisher: PeerJ Ltd
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 2167-8359
Field of Research (FOR): 170113 Social and Community Psychology
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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