Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18706
Title: Can't Get No Satisfaction? The Association Between Community Satisfaction and Population Size for Victoria
Contributor(s): Drew, Joseph (author)orcid ; Dollery, Brian E (author); Kortt, Michael A (author)
Publication Date: 2016
Open Access: Yes
DOI: 10.1111/1467-8500.12117
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/18706
Open Access Link: https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-8500.12117
Abstract: Traditionally, the problem of determining the optimal size in local government has been empirically assessed by estimating the relationship between population size and the costs of services (usually measured in terms of per capita expenditure). These studies, however, have proved largely inconclusive. In comparison, an empirical analysis based on the relationship between the size of government and community satisfaction offers a potentially fruitful contribution to the debate regarding the optimal size of local government. However, to date, few studies have followed this approach. We therefore contribute to this literature by exploring the relationship between population size and community satisfaction for Victorian councils. Our findings provide evidence of an inverted 'U-shaped' relationship, which predicts low community satisfaction at very large and very small population sizes.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Australian Journal of Public Administration, 75(1), p. 65-77
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of Publication: Australia
ISSN: 0313-6647
1467-8500
Field of Research (FOR): 160509 Public Administration
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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Appears in Collections:Journal Article
UNE Business School

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