Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/17728
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dc.contributor.authorRose, Gillianen
dc.contributor.authorMulder, Han Aen
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Andrew Nen
dc.contributor.authorVan Der Werf, Julius Hen
dc.contributor.authorvan Arendonk, Johan A Men
dc.date.accessioned2015-07-28T17:14:00Z
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationAgricultural Systems, v.131, p. 94-104en
dc.identifier.issn1873-2267en
dc.identifier.issn0308-521Xen
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/17728en
dc.description.abstractBreeding programs for livestock require economic weights for traits that reflect the most profitable animal in a given production system. Economic weights are commonly based on average conditions. In pasture based livestock production systems the cost of feed is an important profit driver, but availability of feed from pasture can vary greatly within and between years. Additionally, the price of supplementary feed during periods of feed shortage and the prices for meat and wool vary between years. Varying prices and pasture growth can change the optimal management of the flock affecting profitability. This paper investigates how variation in commodity prices and pasture growth affect the economic values of traits in the breeding objective. We modelled a sheep farm with a self-replacing Merino flock bred for wool and meat in a Mediterranean environment. We optimised management decisions across 5. years using dynamic recursive analysis to maximise profit when commodity prices and pasture growth varied annually. Actual pasture growth and wool, meat, and grain prices from 2005 to 2009 were used. Management could adapt to varying pasture growth and commodity prices by changing sheep numbers, age structure of the flock and amount of grain fed to sheep. The economic value of seven traits in the breeding objective were compared for a scenario with average pasture growth and commodity prices over years and a scenario with varying pasture growth and commodity prices over years. Variation in pasture growth and commodity prices decreased average profit and increased the economic value of all breeding goal traits compared to the average scenario. The order of importance of traits stayed the same between varying and average scenarios but the relative importance of traits changed. The economic values that increased the most were for traits that had increased profit with the smallest impact on energy requirements such as yearling live weight, longevity and fibre diameter. Our results showed that it is important to account for variation in feed availability and commodity prices when determining the expected profit and economic values for traits. The results also suggest that whereas variation in pasture growth and commodity prices between years makes the farming operations less profitable, these changing conditions increase the genetic variation in profitability of sheep. Therefore, genetic improvement has more value relative to scenarios where pasture feed supply and prices are constant.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.ispartofAgricultural Systemsen
dc.titleVarying pasture growth and commodity prices change the value of traits in sheep breeding objectivesen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.agsy.2014.08.007en
dc.subject.keywordsAnimal Breedingen
dc.subject.keywordsQuantitative Genetics (incl Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)en
local.contributor.firstnameGillianen
local.contributor.firstnameHan Aen
local.contributor.firstnameAndrew Nen
local.contributor.firstnameJulius Hen
local.contributor.firstnameJohan A Men
local.subject.for2008070201 Animal Breedingen
local.subject.for2008060412 Quantitative Genetics (incl Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)en
local.subject.seo2008830311 Sheep - Woolen
local.subject.seo2008970106 Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciencesen
local.subject.seo2008830310 Sheep - Meaten
local.profile.schoolAnimal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University, PO Box 338, AH Wageningen, Netherlands, CRC for Sheep Industry Innovation, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australiaen
local.profile.schoolAnimal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University, PO Box 338, AH Wageningen, Netherlandsen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, 90 South Street, Murdoch, WA, Australia, CRC for Sheep Industry Innovation, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australiaen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Environmental and Rural Scienceen
local.profile.schoolAnimal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University, PO Box 338, AH Wageningen, Netherlandsen
local.profile.emailjvanderw@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryC1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordune-20150708-114914en
local.publisher.placeThe Netherlandsen
local.format.startpage94en
local.format.endpage104en
local.peerreviewedYesen
local.identifier.volume131en
local.contributor.lastnameRoseen
local.contributor.lastnameMulderen
local.contributor.lastnameThompsonen
local.contributor.lastnameVan Der Werfen
local.contributor.lastnamevan Arendonken
dc.identifier.staffune-id:jvanderwen
local.profile.orcid0000-0003-2512-1696en
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:17941en
local.identifier.handlehttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/17728en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleVarying pasture growth and commodity prices change the value of traits in sheep breeding objectivesen
local.output.categorydescriptionC1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journalen
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 378<br />Views: 402<br />Downloads: 3en
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