Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/17525
Title: Hydrocarbon marker: a new tool for transit time studies
Contributor(s): Choct, Mingan  (author)orcid ; Wang, J (author); Hughes, RJ (author); Annison, G (author)
Publication Date: 1995
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/17525
Abstract: Feed transit time is the amount of time feed components are retained in the gastrointestinal tract and is often measured by giving a known amount of marker-containing diet and determining the first appearance of the marker in the faeces. Most markers used in digestibility studies are insoluble substances such as Cr203 and acid-insoluble ash which must be incorporated into the diets in substantial quantities for sufficient accuracy in subsequent determinations. Feeding birds a marker-containing diet in a given amount of time is difficult and inaccurate, and force-feeding birds using the Sibbald technique is tedious and not suitable for young broilers. The current paper describes a new fat-soluble marker, a long-chain alkane (C36H74), which can be easily and accurately administered to chickens orally.
Publication Type: Conference Publication
Conference Name: 7th Annual Australian Poultry Science Symposium, Sydney, Australia, 1995
Conference Details: 7th Annual Australian Poultry Science Symposium, Sydney, Australia, 1995
Source of Publication: Proceedings of of the Australian Poultry Science Symposium 1995, p. 200-200
Publisher: Poultry Research Foundation, University of Sydney
Place of Publication: Sydney, Australia
ISSN: 1034-6260
Field of Research (FOR): 070204 Animal Nutrition
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: E1 Refereed Scholarly Conference Publication
Series Name: Australian Poultry Science Symposium Proceedings
Series Number : 7
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