Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/17037
Title: Body region dissatisfaction predicts attention to body regions on other women
Contributor(s): Lykins, Amy (author)orcid ; Ferris, Tamara (author); Graham, Cynthia A (author)
Publication Date: 2014
DOI: 10.1016/j.bodyim.2014.05.003
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/17037
Abstract: The proliferation of "idealized" (i.e., very thin and attractive) women in the media has contributed to increasing rates of body dissatisfaction among women. However, it remains relatively unknown how women attend to these images: does dissatisfaction predict greater or lesser attention to these body regions on others? Fifty healthy women (mean age = 21.8 years) viewed images of idealized and plus-size models; an eye-tracker recorded visual attention. Participants also completed measures of satisfaction for specific body regions, which were then used as predictors of visual attention to these regions on models. Consistent with an avoidance-type process, lower levels of satisfaction with the two regions of greatest reported concern (mid, lower torso) predicted less attention to these regions; greater satisfaction predicted more attention to these regions. While this visual attention bias may aid in preserving self-esteem when viewing idealized others, it may preclude the opportunity for comparisons that could improve self-esteem.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Body Image, 11(4), p. 404-408
Publisher: Elsevier BV
Place of Publication: The Netherlands
ISSN: 1740-1445
1873-6807
Field of Research (FOR): 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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