Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/16703
Title: Energy Systems for Broilers - Recent Developments and Relevance for Feed Formulation
Contributor(s): Swick, Robert A (author)orcid ; Wu, Shubiao (author)orcid ; Rodgers, Nicholas (author); Choct, Mingan (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2014
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/16703
Abstract: Energy continues to gain economic importance as a component of broiler feed. Globally, the poultry industry is a major consumer of energy in the form of grains, protein meals and edible oils. Nutrients consumed by chickens yield energy when oxidised during metabolism. Energy is required for growth, egg production, maintenance and locomotion. Energy consumed beyond requirement is retained for short periods as glycogen and longer term as depot fat. It is up to the nutritionist to formulate diets that meet maximum growth without compromising body composition. Improvements to bird genetics and management changes make this an ongoing task. Understanding energy measurement and use by broilers is important for formulating nutritionists and vital for further progression of the industry. The purpose of this paper is to review energy systems used in feed formulation and discuss how recent developments in the area of net energy might be used to improve the economics of broiler production.
Publication Type: Conference Publication
Source of Publication: Poultry Beyond 2020: Linking Research to Practice - Proceedings of the Fifth International Broiler Nutritionists' Conference, p. 193-207
Publisher: Poultry Industry Association of New Zealand
Place of Publication: Palmerston North, New Zealand
Field of Research (FOR): 070204 Animal Nutrition
HERDC Category Description: E2 Non-Refereed Scholarly Conference Publication
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