Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15525
Title: Profiles of psychological well-being in a sample of Australian university students
Contributor(s): Bhullar, Navjot  (author)orcid ; Hine, Donald W  (author)orcid ; Phillips, Wendy J  (author)orcid 
Publication Date: 2014
DOI: 10.1002/ijop.12022
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15525
Fields of Research (FoR) 2008: 170102 Developmental Psychology and Ageing
170110 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis
170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Fields of Research (FoR) 2020: 520101 Child and adolescent development
520303 Counselling psychology
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2008: 920410 Mental Health
920408 Health Status (e.g. Indicators of Well-Being)
920499 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2020: 200409 Mental health
200407 Health status (incl. wellbeing)
Abstract: The present study identified psychological well-being profiles in a sample of Australian university students (N =207, Mean age = 30.16 years; SD =11.90). Respondents completed two measures: Ryff's (1989) Psychological Well-Being (PWB) scale and Lovibond and Lovibond's (2002) Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) assessing their levels of PWB and depression. Latent profile analysis was applied to six indices of positive functioning derived from PWB scale: self-acceptance, purpose in life, environmental mastery, positive relations with others, personal growth and autonomy. An optimal 5-profile solution, reflecting significant incremental shifts from very low to very high PWB, was interpreted. As predicted, profile membership distinguished participants on depression. Importantly, profiles indicating moderate to very high PWB, particularly with the presence of above average autonomy, reported significantly lower levels of depression. Our results suggest prevention of, and treatment efficacy for, mental health problems may be improved by incorporating strategies that address positive functioning attributes, particularly associated with a sense of autonomy.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: International Journal of Psychology, 49(4), p. 288-294
Publisher: Routledge
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1464-066X
0020-7594
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Psychology

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