Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15290
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dc.contributor.authorGudex, Boyden
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Kuljeeten
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-24T14:24:00Z
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationPLoS One, 9(6), p. 1-7en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15290en
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated whether the prenatal maternal environment in dairy cattle influences the postnatal milking performance of the resulting daughters and grand-daughters. Linear mixed models were used to analyse whole season milk production from ~46000 Jersey and ~123000 Holstein Friesian cows in their 1st and 2nd lactations. Variation in the prenatal environment was associated with a small but significant (P<0.05) proportion of the total phenotypic variation (0.010 to 0.015) in all traits in Holstein Friesian cows and in the first lactation milk volume (0.011) and milk protein (0.011), and the second lactation milk fat (0.015) in the Jersey breed. This indicates that the prenatal environment does influence the adult performance of the subsequent daughter. Associations between daughter performance and dam and grand-dam traits indicative of their prenatal environment were also estimated. A one litre increase in the dam's herd test milk volume was associated with a 7.5 litre increase in the daughters' whole season milk yield and a 1% increase in either the dams' herd test milk fat or protein percentage was associated with a reduction in daughter whole season milk volume (-49.6 and -45.0 litres for dam fat and protein, respectively). Similar results between the grand-dam herd test traits ansd the daughters' whole season milk production were observed with a 1% increase in either grand-dam milk fat or protein percentage associated with a reduction in daughter whole season milk yield (-34.7 and -9.7 litres for fat and protein, respectively). This study revealed that the prenatal environment of the dam and the grand-dam can influence milk production in the subsequent daughters, though the effects are small. The similarity of the results between the dam daughter and the grand-dam daughter analyses suggests that the majority of the prenatal maternal effects are mediated by epigenetic mechanisms.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science (PLoS)en
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Oneen
dc.titlePrenatal Maternal and Possible Transgenerational Epigenetic Effects on Milk Productionen
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0098928en
dcterms.accessRightsGolden
dc.subject.keywordsQuantitative Genetics (incl Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)en
dc.subject.keywordsAnimal Breedingen
dc.subject.keywordsEpigenetics (incl Genome Methylation and Epigenomics)en
local.contributor.firstnameBoyden
local.contributor.firstnameDaviden
local.contributor.firstnameKuljeeten
local.subject.for2008070201 Animal Breedingen
local.subject.for2008060412 Quantitative Genetics (incl Disease and Trait Mapping Genetics)en
local.subject.for2008060404 Epigenetics (incl Genome Methylation and Epigenomics)en
local.subject.seo2008830302 Dairy Cattleen
local.profile.schoolSchool of Environmental and Rural Scienceen
local.profile.schoolEnvironmental and Rural Scienceen
local.profile.schoolEnvironmental and Rural Scienceen
local.profile.emailbgudex2@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryC1en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordune-20140612-140148en
local.publisher.placeUnited States of Americaen
local.identifier.runningnumbere98928en
local.format.startpage1en
local.format.endpage7en
local.peerreviewedYesen
local.identifier.volume9en
local.identifier.issue6en
local.access.fulltextYesen
local.contributor.lastnameGudexen
local.contributor.lastnameJohnsonen
local.contributor.lastnameSinghen
dc.identifier.staffune-id:bgudex2en
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:15506en
local.identifier.handlehttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15290en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitlePrenatal Maternal and Possible Transgenerational Epigenetic Effects on Milk Productionen
local.output.categorydescriptionC1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journalen
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 215<br />Views: 258<br />Downloads: 0en
local.search.authorGudex, Boyden
local.search.authorJohnson, Daviden
local.search.authorSingh, Kuljeeten
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School of Environmental and Rural Science
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