Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15273
Title: Impact and outcomes of a rural Personal Helpers and Mentors service
Contributor(s): Dunstan, Debra  (author)orcid ; Todd, Anna K (author); Kennedy, Linda M (author); Anderson, Donnah (author)
Publication Date: 2014
DOI: 10.1111/ajr.12074
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15273
Abstract: Objective: To describe impacts and outcomes associated with the Personal Helpers and Mentor's (PHaMs) service in a rural Australian town. Design: A descriptive analysis of longitudinal data, uncontrolled pre-test and post-test caseworker ratings, and retrospective pre-test/post-test self-ratings and feedback comments were collected from convenience samples. Setting: A community-based mental health recovery service. Participants: n = 76 mental health consumers; mean age = 37.78 years; 45% male; 63% Aboriginal; primary diagnoses = 41% psychotic disorder and 61% mood disorder; co-morbid diagnosis = 45% substance use disorder. Interventions: Individual recovery plan (IRP), personal goal setting, caseworker mentoring and support. Main outcome measures: Gains towards goals, the Role Functioning Scale (RFS), self-ratings and feedback comments. Results: The most frequently addressed goals were: attend mental health treatment services, acquire suitable accommodation and be more involved in the community. IRP completers (n = 19) showed a significant improvement in caseworker-rated adaptive functioning which was adequate at case closure (t(18) = -4.38, P < 0.001). Participant (n = 19) ratings of the service and its key performance indicators suggested global satisfaction and gains in the management of everyday tasks, use of medications and community engagement. Good rapport was reported with the locally trained and predominantly Aboriginal (56%) staff. Conclusions: PHaMs shows promise for assisting rural people with mental illness to improve their everyday functioning, medication management and community involvement. Recruitment and capacity-building of Aboriginal staff appears to facilitate Aboriginal consumer participation.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Australian Journal of Rural Health, 22(2), p. 50-55
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Place of Publication: Australia
ISSN: 1038-5282
1440-1584
Field of Research (FoR) 2008: 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Field of Research (FoR) 2020: 520304 Health psychology
520303 Counselling psychology
520302 Clinical psychology
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2008: 920209 Mental Health Services
920303 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Health System Performance (incl. Effectiveness of Interventions)
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO) 2020: 200305 Mental health services
210303 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health system performance
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
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