Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15005
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dc.contributor.authorSims, Margareten
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-08T09:47:00Z
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citation40 years of Playgroup: Celebrating Our Story of Connecting Communities, p. 42-44en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/15005en
dc.description.abstractThe world is beginning to realise that the early years of life are very important. We now know that children's experiences in their first few years of life shape the way their brain develops . When young children experience something again and again (for example when they hear particular sounds) the brain pathways used in processing that information are reinforced. A child who is surrounded in a rich language environment will develop complex brain mechanisms for processing language. A child who is surrounded with challenging play experiences will develop complex problem solving brain mechanisms. Conversely, children who grow up in settings where they do not experience thought provoking learning opportunities will not develop the complex brain mechanisms necessary for them to participate equally in society as they mature. The old saying "use it or lose it" applies to young children's development. If children do not have certain opportunities they lose the brain mechanisms to manage such experiences later in life. For example, children who are born into a family who only speak one language gradually lose the ability to perceive and produce sounds that are NOT in their home language so that when, as adults, they try to learn a second language they are disadvantaged and unable to speak without an accent. Children growing up in disadvantaged poor health and wellbeing in adulthood. Forcing children to engage in repetitive practice may help produce a 'winner' but at the cost of higher stress levels and poorer health and wellbeing. Ideally we want children to experience rich learning opportunities in a context of low stress: and this is exactly what play offers.en
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherPlaygroup Australiaen
dc.relation.ispartof40 years of Playgroup: Celebrating Our Story of Connecting Communitiesen
dc.relation.isversionof1en
dc.titleParents, Playgroups & Physiology: The Importance of the Early Years of Lifeen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.subject.keywordsEarly Childhood Education (excl Maori)en
local.contributor.firstnameMargareten
local.subject.for2008130102 Early Childhood Education (excl Maori)en
local.subject.seo2008940105 Childrens/Youth Services and Childcareen
local.identifier.epublicationsvtls086690090en
local.profile.schoolSchool of Educationen
local.profile.emailmsims7@une.edu.auen
local.output.categoryB2en
local.record.placeauen
local.record.institutionUniversity of New Englanden
local.identifier.epublicationsrecordune-20140228-141947en
local.publisher.placeCanberra, Australiaen
local.identifier.totalchapters20en
local.format.startpage42en
local.format.endpage44en
local.title.subtitleThe Importance of the Early Years of Lifeen
local.contributor.lastnameSimsen
dc.identifier.staffune-id:msims7en
local.profile.orcid0000-0003-4686-4245en
local.profile.roleauthoren
local.identifier.unepublicationidune:15220en
dc.identifier.academiclevelAcademicen
local.title.maintitleParents, Playgroups & Physiologyen
local.output.categorydescriptionB2 Chapter in a Book - Otheren
local.relation.urlhttp://playgroupaustralia.org.au/Documents/PG-40-Years-A4-Booklet-V3a.aspxen
local.description.statisticsepubsVisitors: 184<br />Views: 184<br />Downloads: 0en
local.search.authorSims, Margareten
local.uneassociationUnknownen
local.year.published2013en
Appears in Collections:Book Chapter
School of Education
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