Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/14799
Title: Taking a de-binarised envirosocial approach to reconciling the environment vs economy debate: lessons from climate change litigation for planning in NSW, Australia
Contributor(s): Bartel, Robyn  (author); McFarland, Paul  (author); Hearfield, Colin  (author)
Publication Date: 2014
DOI: 10.3828/tpr.2014.6
Handle Link: https://hdl.handle.net/1959.11/14799
Abstract: In 1979 the New South Wales planning system was considered visionary when it introduced public participation and consideration of environmental matters in land-use decision-making long-dominated by resourcist perspectives. A resurgence of the economic rationalist agenda has compromised these early gains, and the system has since failed to deliver ecologically sustainable development, liveable communities and good governance. In several recent climate change cases, the specialist Land and Environment Court has equated the public interest with ecologically sustainable development. By de-binarising the false human-nature dichotomy, the court has reframed and reconciled the environment vs economy debate and achieved better planning outcomes. We describe this approach as envirosocial, and we show how adopting an envirosocial approach, supported by a renewed commitment to integrated evidence-based policy and broader public participation, could be used to realise a more sustainable future.
Publication Type: Journal Article
Source of Publication: Town Planning Review, 85(1), p. 67-95
Publisher: Liverpool University Press
Place of Publication: United Kingdom
ISSN: 1478-341X
0041-0020
Field of Research (FOR): 180111 Environmental and Natural Resources Law
160403 Social and Cultural Geography
Socio-Economic Outcome Codes: 959999 Cultural Understanding not elsewhere classified
960799 Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards not elsewhere classified
949999 Law, Politics and Community Services not elsewhere classified
Peer Reviewed: Yes
HERDC Category Description: C1 Refereed Article in a Scholarly Journal
Statistics to Oct 2018: Visitors: 240
Views: 238
Downloads: 0
Appears in Collections:Journal Article
School of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

Files in This Item:
2 files
File Description SizeFormat 
Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

10
checked on Nov 30, 2018

Page view(s)

178
checked on May 2, 2019
Google Media

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in Research UNE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.